WHITE BALANCE SETTINGS IN CAMERA WITH COLOUR CARD CHART TO ALLOW PRECEPTS/CUSTOM SETTINGS TO BE MADE TO FIND YOUR PERFECT CONDITIONS FOR LIGHTING AND COLOUR DIFFERENTIATION.

WHITE BALANCE SETTINGS IN CAMERA WITH COLOUR CARD CHART TO ALLOW PRECEPTS/CUSTOM SETTINGS TO BE MADE TO FIND YOUR PERFECT CONDITIONS FOR LIGHTING AND COLOUR DIFFERENTIATION.

Introduction:

During lecture an experimentation was carried out using a variety of white balance settings to predetermine what settings should be used overall when making a composition using the light that was currently available as a photographer. The mini experiment provided us with the experience to gauge which white balance settings would be appropriate to use given that every photography assignment can be prone to light changes. i.e. outdoors to fluorescent lighting and led compared to tungsten. The impact of use will have an effect by lighting or colour on our overall photograph/composition, so care needs to be taken in order to ensure a correct setting at the time of exposure.

Method/Presentation:

Through pre lighting experimentation within a low light setting with deliberately chosen bad lighting conditions, we looked at different settings in order to find the perfect conditions for lighting and also to allow for any colour differentiation. The lighting settings were predetermined by the lecturing staff.

Conclusion:

With an 18% grey card or precept/custom settings for each individual case is preferable but when out on photography assignment at different locations this is not always possible. The conclusion is therefore to test out as quickly as possible if true authenticity is required in colour composition or if your white balance settings do not feel authentic, then testing with either an 18% grey card or a white piece of paper will simply assist you with gauging the right settings for your photography project.

This experiment as seen on the contact sheets and the blog demonstrates that for testing and colour variants it is wise to use precepts and custom balance settings for each lighting scenario you may come across as a photographer or to organize a test prior to shooting in your chosen environment.

In this particular settings the Auto White Balance appeared to be the more appropriate setting for this particular camera on this location. Tungsten and shade came in second and third. The experience of a photographer at realizing what the settings ought to be within each location would be effective when it comes to time management and costs for the photographer and client.

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for any other images please refer to contact sheet

Through pre lighting experimentation within a low light setting with deliberately chosen bad lighting conditions, we looked at different settings in order to find the perfect conditions for lighting and also to allow for any colour differentiation. The lighting settings were predetermined by the lecturing staff.

Conclusion:

With an 18% grey card or precept/custom settings for each individual case is preferable but when out on photography assignment at different locations this is not always possible. The conclusion is therefore to test out as quickly as possible if true authenticity is required in colour composition or if your white balance settings do not feel authentic, then testing with either an 18% grey card or a white piece of paper will simply assist you with gauging the right settings for your photography project.

Please note: these files could not be converted from RAW as they were in a different camera setting (JPEG format only. Capture One Software has not been available.

These images are for experimentation purposes only.

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